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Best angles to hit lateral ligs

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  • #46
    Hoyt,

    >As your hanging progressed, did the area on your shaft that you attached to change in shape and firmness significantly? <

    Slowly over time, my area of attachment moved back toward the base, as I gained, and moved up in weight. Shape and firmness did not permanently change. There were instances where issues occurred, from infected hair follicles, to edema.

    >It has been getting easier, however. Is the only means of further toughening the hanging attachment area through adding on more sets at my current weight for more days or do you have any other tips? <

    Be sure you are not hanging with too much blood in the head and upper shaft. Other than that, and using correct technique, you must allow time for the tissues to adapt to the stresses. Some adapt slower than others. If you are doing everything else correctly, you have to relax, and do not press the stress. That just causes problems.

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    • #47
      What made you move the attachment point further back? I’ve read on other threads that doing that is more for skin stretching and doesn’t grab the internals as much. Do you remember how far back it eventually went, like almost all the way to the base? My hanger sits about 1.25-1.5” behind the coronal ridge viewed from the side, I’ve definitely felt a better gripping since moving it back slightly. Is there a sensation you felt or desire to cause a different kind of physical change that made you move it back?

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      • #48
        Hoyt,

        >What made you move the attachment point further back?<

        it seemed like the same distance as always, relative to the internals. But was definitely moved back over time. Made hanging more comfortable, while still stressing most of the shaft.

        >I’ve read on other threads that doing that is more for skin stretching and doesn’t grab the internals as much.<

        That is correct. You do not want to do it unless you have made good gains, and it happens slowly over time.

        >Do you remember how far back it eventually went, like almost all the way to the base?<

        Oh hell no. It was relatively in the same place on the internals. The same percentage back, as when I started.

        >My hanger sits about 1.25-1.5” behind the coronal ridge viewed from the side, I’ve definitely felt a better gripping since moving it back slightly. Is there a sensation you felt or desire to cause a different kind of physical change that made you move it back?<

        No. It was more comfortable. It was never close to mid shaft. It was on about the same spot of the internals. I think the furthest back I ever attached was about 2.5 inches. That was hanging a lot of weight, after making almost all my gains.

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        • #49
          To clarify, how close do you mean when you say close to the base? Was the hanger attached entirely to the portion of your shaft ahead of your midpoint?

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          • #50
            Hoyt,

            >To clarify, how close do you mean when you say close to the base? <

            I did not say I attached close to the base. I never did, except in tests. I always attached toward the head.

            >Was the hanger attached entirely to the portion of your shaft ahead of your midpoint?<

            I always attached ahead of the midpoint. Toward the head.

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            • #51
              Well to be specific, you said “…my area of attachment moved back toward the base, as I gained, and moved up in weight.” Did you simply mean this in that the hanger stayed roughly the same distance from the base as your shaft became longer (roughly the same amount of shaft behind the hanger and more shaft ahead of it over time)?

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              • #52
                Hoyt,

                >Well to be specific, you said “…my area of attachment moved back toward the base, as I gained, and moved up in weight.” Did you simply mean this in that the hanger stayed roughly the same distance from the base as your shaft became longer (roughly the same amount of shaft behind the hanger and more shaft ahead of it over time)?<

                No, not that much. Just a couple of inches at the most. So starting, I was probably a half inch behind the coronal ridge, and ended up 2.5 inches from the coronal ridge.

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                Last edited by Bib; 03-31-2022, 11:38 PM.

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                • #53
                  Hey Bib, back again to get a tip (pun intended). I’m having trouble with blood collecting in my tip in sets following my first, nothing I try works. I’ve attempted different levels of looseness for my wrapped bundle, squeezed the tip and upper shaft before and while tightening the hanger, loosening the wrap a little or unwrapping between sets, the head stays full despite it all. Should I try squeezing the head and shaft for longer between sets or is there anything else I can try?

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                  • #54
                    Hoyt,

                    >Hey Bib, back again to get a tip (pun intended). I’m having trouble with blood collecting in my tip in sets following my first, nothing I try works. I’ve attempted different levels of looseness for my wrapped bundle, squeezed the tip and upper shaft before and while tightening the hanger, loosening the wrap a little or unwrapping between sets, the head stays full despite it all. Should I try squeezing the head and shaft for longer between sets or is there anything else I can try?<

                    So are you pushing the hanger to the head before beginning the tightening process?

                    If so, exactly what happens? When is the blood filling the head?

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                    • #55
                      Blood fills a little bit during the first set and then exacerbates once the hanger is removed. When I attach, I sit the shaft as deep in the hanger as I can without pinching upon closing, then close and push towards the tip so as to cover it with the wrap, squeezing it and then pulling it back to then tighten. I can never get all the blood out and after it’s pulled and tightened, blood rushes back in. It’s like I start getting a very soft erection that doesn’t fully subside.

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                      • #56
                        Hoyt,

                        >Blood fills a little bit during the first set and then exacerbates once the hanger is removed. When I attach, I sit the shaft as deep in the hanger as I can without pinching upon closing, then close and push towards the tip so as to cover it with the wrap, squeezing it and then pulling it back to then tighten. I can never get all the blood out and after it’s pulled and tightened, blood rushes back in. It’s like I start getting a very soft erection that doesn’t fully subside.<

                        OK, then you are not holding enough forward pressure, as you go through the tightening process.

                        When you first attach the hanger, before tightening much, if at all, you need to push it all the way to the head, and allow the excess blood to move past the wrap. If it cannot, then either your wrap is too tight, you tightened the hanger too much before pushing forward, or a combination.

                        If you still cannot get out the excess blood, then squeeze the head and upper shaft, and get out most of the blood, before you push the hanger forward. If that does not work, let me know.

                        After pushing forward, hold it there a minute, until all the excess blood is removed. Then use your left thumb to reestablish the gap between head and hanger, as you go through the tightening process.

                        You want to push down/forward with your left thumb, on the shaft, between head and hanger, while you are lifting up on the hanger with your left palm, as you tighten the hanger with your right hand. This will force the shaft low in the shaft well, and keep the excess blood from returning. While waiting between tightening periods, hold forward pressure on the hanger, to keep excess blood from returning. When you finish tightening, the head should be flaccid, and the hanger tight.

                        From the time you remove the excess blood, until the set is over, you need some forward pressure, to keep the blood from returning

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